Welcome to London's History
_HOMEPAGE_TOPICS_DOWNLOADS
    create an account |
_USERACCOUNT_SUBMITNEWS_SHOWTOP  
Theme by www.UserWear.de


Discover the great, the strange, the seedy, the inspired, the criminal and the downright ordinary past of one of the World's Greatest Cities!

SITE MAP




· Home

Modules
· AvantGo
· Downloads
· FAQ
· Members List
· News
· Recommend Us
· Reviews
· Search
· Sections
· Stats
· Topics
· Top List
· Web Links



The Special Sections are only available to registered users. Login or register for free here.
ENGLAND
Samuel Pepys
Elizabeth I
London's Underworld
Fleet Marriages.
The Cries of London
Updated.




For there is good news yet to hear and fine things to be seen,
Before we go to Paradis by way of Kensal Green.


-- G K Chesterton, 1914



We have 75 guests and 0 members online

You are an anonymous user. You can register for free by clicking here


View all articles for this topic.

Actors and Authors by W S Gilbert
Posted by Bill McCann on (1359 Reads)
Sir William Schwenk Gilbert (1836-1911) is today best remembered for his collaboration with Sir Arthur Sullivan which gave us the wonderful and quintessentially English Operas which bear their joint names. Recently, a souvenir brochure for a benefit matinee which was held at the Theatre Royal Drury Lane on May 11th 1909, in aid of the Queen Alexandra Sanatorium at Davos, came to light. The show starred many of the great entertainers of the day, including Harry Lauder, Harry Tate, Ellen Terry and Weedon Grossmith. The brochure contained a section, containing illustrations, prose and drama, provided by authors and entertainers who did not appear on the day. Amongst these was this piece by Gilbert. In it he ponders, with his wit undiminished, the relationship between the author and the actors who bring his work before the public.



Read more... (10358 bytes more) 192 Comments Send this story to a friend Printer friendly page

The Penny Gaff
Posted by Bill McCann on (786 Reads)
In his London Labour and the London Poor, Henry Mayhew has left us a detailed picture of London street life in the mid nineteenth century. Here he gives us a lively account of the impromptu theatres that provided nightly entertainment for the costermongers. Housed in ordinary shops, and temporary by their very nature, these were called the Penny Gaff. In his description, Mayhew also, inadvertently, gives an insight into the mind of the "moral man" in the Victorian period.



Note: The complete text of London Labour and the London Poor can be found on-line as part of the Perseus Project

Read more... (17065 bytes more) comments? Send this story to a friend Printer friendly page

The Vic Gallery
Posted by Anthony Waldstock on (726 Reads)
In his London Labour and the London Poor, Henry Mayhew has left us a detailed picture of London street life in the mid nineteenth century. Here he vividly describes the Gallery audience at the Royal Coburg Theatre, In his day better known as "The Vic" and in our own day as the "Old Vic".



Note: The complete text of London Labour and the London Poor can be found on-line as part of the Perseus Project

Read more... (9915 bytes more) comments? Send this story to a friend Printer friendly page

The First Circus
Posted by Anthony Waldstock on (968 Reads)
A seventeen-year old runaway with "the build of a Hercules and the voice of a Stentor" who became a daring and dashing young dragoon. A charger called Gibraltar. A wife called Petsy. A lost diamond ring. King George III and a maddened horse on Westminster Bridge. Centrifugal force. These are the unlikely antecedents of the entertainment that we know today as the Circus. It began life in a field in Lambeth and went on to become one of the sights of London in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. In the long, slow, development of the classic show it brought spectacular Military and Nautical melodramas to the London stage which featured 400 extras and a tank holding 50,000 gallons of water. And we must not forget those fashionable diners at the Alhambra who were stunned as the "Daring Young Man on the Flying Trapeze" flew above their heads whilst they ate their suppers!

Read more... (14720 bytes more) comments? Send this story to a friend Printer friendly page

Joseph Grimaldi
Posted by Anthony Waldstock on (839 Reads)
The Clown from whom all clowns have come to be known as "Joey" died in London on May 31st 1837. He was born 58 years earlier to the mistress of a 58 year-old dancer and pantaloon. The father was both cruel and ambitious and had the young child make his first stage appearance as an infant dancer in 1781. For the next seven years the young Joey endured a harsh upbringing. Never seeming to live up to his father's he was beaten regularly. In later life he attributed one of his earliest triumphs to the tears that followed a particularly harsh beating. He went on to become one of the greatest and best-loved figures in the history of English Pantomime.

Note: Grimaldi's memoirs were edited by Charles Dickens: Memoirs of Joseph Grimaldi
And an excellent history of Pantomime has been published by the BBC:"Oh, yes it is"! : a history of pantomime
Some informative websites about Grimaldi and the history of Pantomime are:
History
Panto
Panto tradition
Pantomime
Read more... (7041 bytes more) comments? Send this story to a friend Printer friendly page


© 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006. Unless otherwise indicated, all written material on the storyoflondon site is the copyright of Bill McCann. All logos and trademarks in this site are property of their respective owner. The comments are property of their posters.

Google
 
Web www.storyoflondon.com

This site is a member of WebRing.
To browse visit Here.

This site is a member of WebRing.
To browse visit Here.

This European History Site
is owned by
storyoflondon

If you would like to join this ring
Click Here

[Prev 5][Prev][Next][Random][Next 5] [List]

This web site was made with PostNuke, a web portal system written in PHP. PostNuke is Free Software released under the GNU/GPL license.
You can syndicate our news using the file backend.php