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ENGLAND
Samuel Pepys
Elizabeth I
London's Underworld
Fleet Marriages.
The Cries of London
Updated.




So poetry, which is in Oxford made An art, in London only is a trade.

-- John Dryden 1673



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London's PeopleThe Street Stationery-Sellers II
Posted by Bill McCann on (6 Reads)
London has always been a noisy place. Amongst the cacophony of sound in the Victorian streets was the chanting of the "Patterers", either moving or stationary. In his London Labour and the London Poor, Henry Mayhew devoted an entire chapter to an investigation of the artistry, lives and habits of these Londoners. In the last of our extracts we learn of the crushing poverty to which illness could reduce even the most genteel. Our witnesses are a gentlewoman and a gentleman. Their insight to the desperate straits of Victorian live at the bottom of the ladder are very poignant.



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London's Schools in 1731
Posted by Bill McCann on (21 Reads)
"London in 1731" is a wonderful guide book to the city which was penned sometime in the early 18th century and subsequently brought up to date. The author is supposed to be a Portuguese merchant named Don Manoel Gonzales but the internal evidence demonstrates that this is almost certainly a nom de plume. It is more likely that our author was an accomplished native of London. The guide was edited by Professor Henry Morley and published by Cassell as part of their wonderful little National Library series in 1888. The author now turns his attention to the schools in London, including the famous St. Paul's and Westminster Schools which still provide an excellent education today.



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The Queen's Physik II
Posted by Bill McCann on (13 Reads)
The publication, for profit, of intimate details of the British Royal Family by their former servants is at least 350 years old. What may be the first example of this exploitation of "insider knowledge," was published in 1658 by a former servant of Henrietta Maria, Queen Consort to Charles I. The book details the "Receipts" recipes for medicinal cures and favourite foods of the Royal Family contained in the Queen's Closet. Some of the medicinal recipes are quackery indeed, and all the more interesting for that. In this serialisation, the spelling has been modernised to aid comprehension but the habit of always capitalising proper nouns has bee retained to add 'flavour' to the text. Our next instalment consists of a list of all of those who wrote or prescribed the remedies. They include the monarchs, Mary I, Edward VI, Elizabeth I, Charles I, courtiers such as Walter Raleigh and Francis bacon and a host of doctors, gentlemen and ladies of the court.



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Law and Order in LondonCrime and Punishment: Thomas Savage
Posted by Bill McCann on (28 Reads)
A Profligate Apprentice who murdered a Fellow-Servant, was executed twice, and finally buried 28th of October, 1668.



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London's PeopleThe Street Stationery-Sellers I
Posted by Bill McCann on (33 Reads)
London has always been a noisy place. Amongst the cacophony of sound in the Victorian streets was the chanting of the "Patterers", either moving or stationary. In his London Labour and the London Poor, Henry Mayhew devoted an entire chapter to an investigation of the artistry, lives and habits of these Londoners. In the next of our extracts we meet the sellers of stationery papers and envelopes mostly but also letters written for those who cannot themselves write.



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On a day like today...


1840
Friday January 10, The penny post, whereby mail was delivered at a standard charge rather than paid for by the recipient, began. There were six daily deliveries in London.

More November Anniversaries





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London's History

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