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ENGLAND
Samuel Pepys
Elizabeth I
London's Underworld
Fleet Marriages.
The Cries of London
Updated.




Unreal City, Under the brown fog of a winter dawn, A crowd flowed over London Bridge, so many I had not thought death had undone, so many. Sighs, short and infrequent, were exhaled, And each man fixed his eyes before his feet Flowed up the hill and down King William Street, To where St Mary Woolnoth kept the hours With a dead sound on the final stroke of nine.

-- T S Eliot 1922



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London's PeopleThe Street Stationery-Sellers II
Posted by Bill McCann on (6 Reads)
London has always been a noisy place. Amongst the cacophony of sound in the Victorian streets was the chanting of the "Patterers", either moving or stationary. In his London Labour and the London Poor, Henry Mayhew devoted an entire chapter to an investigation of the artistry, lives and habits of these Londoners. In the last of our extracts we learn of the crushing poverty to which illness could reduce even the most genteel. Our witnesses are a gentlewoman and a gentleman. Their insight to the desperate straits of Victorian live at the bottom of the ladder are very poignant.



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London's PeopleThe Street Stationery-Sellers I
Posted by Bill McCann on (33 Reads)
London has always been a noisy place. Amongst the cacophony of sound in the Victorian streets was the chanting of the "Patterers", either moving or stationary. In his London Labour and the London Poor, Henry Mayhew devoted an entire chapter to an investigation of the artistry, lives and habits of these Londoners. In the next of our extracts we meet the sellers of stationery papers and envelopes mostly but also letters written for those who cannot themselves write.



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London's PeopleVictorian Etiquette IX: Petitions
Posted by Bill McCann on (3168 Reads)
The London Journal, launched in 1845, was one of the most widely read publications of nineteenth-century Britain. Its weekly appearance ushered in the period when mass-market reading, in a modern sense, was born. Between April 12 and August 30 1845, the Journal carried seventeen articles under the heading "Etiquette for the Millions," written by G.W.M Reynolds. They were clearly aimed at educating the mass readership (mostly the newly emerging middle-classes) in the behaviour expected of them in public. At times trenchant, the views expressed in the articles describe a view of society that is very, very different from that which we experience today. But, perhaps, one that many sections of modern society hanker after. In this set of instructions we are shown precisely the mode of address to be used in submitting a petition to the Queen, the Houses of Parliament or Government Departments. And of course, it matters greatly whether the petition comes from an Assembly or from an individual . . .



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London's PeopleVictorian Etiquette VIII: Behaviour out of Doors
Posted by Bill McCann on (3236 Reads)
The London Journal, launched in 1845, was one of the most widely read publications of nineteenth-century Britain. Its weekly appearance ushered in the period when mass-market reading, in a modern sense, was born. Between April 12 and August 30 1845, the Journal carried seventeen articles under the heading "Etiquette for the Millions," written by G.W.M Reynolds. They were clearly aimed at educating the mass readership (mostly the newly emerging middle-classes) in the behaviour expected of them in public. At times trenchant, the views expressed in the articles describe a view of society that is very, very different from that which we experience today. But, perhaps, one that many sections of modern society hanker after. In this set of instructions we are introduced to the mysteries of the glove and warned against carrying "a huge stick, fit only to wrench off knockers or break policeman's heads." And ladies are required to sacrifice a new silk gown if caught in the rain. . .!



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London's PeopleVictorian Etiquette VII: Dress Female Attire
Posted by Bill McCann on (1405 Reads)
The London Journal, launched in 1845, was one of the most widely read publications of nineteenth-century Britain. Its weekly appearance ushered in the period when mass-market reading, in a modern sense, was born. Between April 12 and August 30 1845, the Journal carried seventeen articles under the heading "Etiquette for the Millions," written by G.W.M Reynolds. They were clearly aimed at educating the mass readership (mostly the newly emerging middle-classes) in the behaviour expected of them in public. At times trenchant, the views expressed in the articles describe a view of society that is very, very different from that which we experience today. But, perhaps, one that many sections of modern society hanker after. Having the rules of sobriety in the matter of male attire we are now instructed on the requisites for a well-dressed woman and they is definitely NOT those of a lady of fashion. As for the "abomination" of tight lacing . . .!



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