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ENGLAND
Samuel Pepys
Elizabeth I
London's Underworld
Fleet Marriages.
The Cries of London
Updated.




This is a London particular ...A fog, miss

-- Charles Dickens, Bleak House, 1853



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The Street Card-Sellers IV
Posted by Bill McCann on (71 Reads)
London has always been a noisy place. Amongst the cacophony of sound in the Victorian streets was the chanting of the "Patterers", either moving or stationary. In his London Labour and the London Poor, Henry Mayhew devoted an entire chapter to an investigation of the artistry, lives and habits of these Londoners. In the next of our extracts we meet the sellers of the forerunners of the picture-postcard and of playing cards. The most popular "tourist" site seems to have been the Crystal Palace which was newly erected in Hyde Park But the Police moved in .



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The Street Card-Sellers III
Posted by Bill McCann on (109 Reads)
London has always been a noisy place. Amongst the cachophony of sound in the Victorian streets was the chanting of the "Patterers", either moving or stationary. In his London Labour and the London Poor, Henry Mayhew devoted an entire chapter to an investigation of the artistry, lives and habits of these Londoners. In the next of our extracts we meet the sellers of race cards and lists including Gentleman Jerry and Captain Carrot. We hear too that the ladies specialise in the sale of "improper publications!"



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Patterers: The Street Card-Sellers II
Posted by Bill McCann on (67 Reads)
London has always been a noisy place. Amongst the cachophony of sound in the Victorian streets was the chanting of the "Patterers", either moving or stationary. In his London Labour and the London Poor, Henry Mayhew devoted an entire chapter to an investigation of the artistry, lives and habits of these Londoners. In the next of our extracts we remain the "educated Patterer" who sells do-it-yourself short-hand kits. After hearing some of his banter with his audience we hear how he descended into disgrace and poverty and, finally, of his great love of children.



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Patterers: The Street Card-Sellers I
Posted by Bill McCann on (75 Reads)
London has always been a noisy place. Amongst the cachophony of sound in the Victorian streets was the chanting of the "Patterers", either moving or stationary. In his London Labour and the London Poor, Henry Mayhew devoted an entire chapter to an investigation of the artistry, lives and habits of these Londoners. In the next of our extracts he turns his attention to an already dead breed the patterer who specialised in the selling of various forms of cards. We first make the acquaintance of an "educated Patterer" who sells do-it-yourself short-hand kits!



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Of The Abodes, Tricks, Marriage, Character, And Characteristics Of The Different Grades Of Patterers Part VII
Posted by Bill McCann on (390 Reads)
London has always been a noisy place. Amongst the cachophony of sound in the Victorian streets was the chanting of the "Patterers", either moving or stationary. In his London Labour and the London Poor, Henry Mayhew devoted an entire chapter to an investigation of the artistry, lives and habits of these Londoners. An extensive section of the chapter gives us a very detailed description of the lifestyle and con tricks of the pattering class. In our seventh instalment we hear "OF THE CHILDREN IN LOW LODGINGHOUSES" - whose prospects are bleak indeed.



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